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Have you kissed the Son?

November 26th, 2013

Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and you perish in the way, for his wrath is quickly kindled. Blessed are all who take refuge in him. (Psalms 2:12; English Standard Version)

Do homage in purity, lest He be angry, and ye perish in the way, when suddenly His wrath is kindled. Happy are all they that take refuge in Him. (Psalms 2:12; Jewish Publication Society)

A quick perusal of this verse in the two versions will show that there is some disagreement here.  But, why?

The phrase under debate is the Hebrew words that can be transliterated in English as neeshku-var.  The Hebrew word nshk, can mean “kiss” or “paying homage.”  Var is the Aramaic word for “son.”  So why has the JPS translated it, “do homage in purity?”

Although this is the tradition of some Medieval Jewish sages, there are notable exceptions, such as Ibn Ezra, and the Radak.  The Zohar also speaks of this verse, understanding the word as son.  More importantly, the Talmud recognizes this psalm as Messianic, and speaking in relationship to both Messiah son of Joseph (i.e. Yeshua or Jesus), and Messiah son of David (b. Sukkah 52a).

Already in Psalm 2 we are asked why the world rebels against the Lord and His Anointed (v.1). Later in the psalm God calls this anointed his Son whom He has begotten (v. 7).  So in the words of Michael Brown, to whom I am indebted for the information in this article*, “Why then should it be considered odd that the psalm would close with a twofold admonition, namely, to ‘serve the Lord with fear’ and ‘kiss the son?’”

Where traditional Jewish interpreters vary, they are required to say that the word as written is not quite correct, and that it represents a different word (like the Hebrew word for “purity” which is very similar).  As demonstrated above, however, that is not necessary.

Who is right?  Those who take the words as they are written and translate them within the context of the Psalm; or those who –  disregarding what is written both in the Scriptural text and even, at times, in rabbinic tradition – translate according to their own idea of what they want Scripture to say.

Sadly, many (happily not all) passages in Scripture that point to Yeshua as Messiah are treated this way. Still, more Jewish people are coming to “kiss the Son” today than since the time of Yeshua.  Why not listen to God and do the same?

Please contact us for more information, or you can click here.

* For a more detailed discussion on this passage, read “Answering Jewish Objections of Jesus: Volume Three – Messianic Prophecy Objections,” by Michael Brown.  2003.  Baker Books, Grand Rapids, MI

Contributed by Daniel Muller, a Jewish believer and the General Director of New Covenant Forum.

Posted in Biblical Interpretation, Daniel Muller, Following God, Jewish Objections to Jesus, Jewish Tradition, Messiah, Messiah in the Tanach, Talmud vs. Tanakh, The Bible, Things Doctrinal and Theological | No Comments »

The Right Kind of Judaism?

November 18th, 2013

But the word is very near you. It is in your mouth and in your heart, so that you can do it. (Deuteronomy 30:14)

God was telling the people of Israel that they did not need a lot of rules in order to relate to Him.  They only needed the Law that he gave them.  Yet centuries later, the religious leaders of Israel began heaping all kinds of rules and regulations and calling them Laws.  God sought a circumcised heart (Deuteronomy 10:16) – a people after His own heart like King David was (1 Samuel 13:14), but instead we had rules piled upon us to become a burden (Luke 11:46).

If the Judaism of the rabbis (i.e. Talmudic Judaism) is the correct form of Judaism, then why didn’t the Lord return the nation to the Land of Israel in the 10th or 11th Century C.E., when rabbinic Judaism was in its golden age and supposedly every Jew knew the Talmud-Torah? Why did he wait till the time when most Jews were secular; yet more Jews were believing in Yeshua (Jesus) than ever before? Makes you think, doesn’t it?

God told us through the prophet Zechariah:

They [will] look on me, on him whom they have pierced, they shall mourn for him, as one mourns for an only child, and weep bitterly over him, as one weeps over a firstborn. (Zechariah 12:10)

Jewish people are coming to know Yeshua as their Messiah and Lord, just as God promised.  Why shouldn’t you?  Contact us to learn more.

We would love to send you the book, “Twelve Sons of Israel,” about 12 rabbis who came to faith in Yeshua.  Just ask for it when you contact us.

Posted in Anonymous, Following God, Jesus and Jews, Jewish Tradition, Jews and Jesus, Messiah, Some Words and Thoughts, Talmud vs. Tanakh | No Comments »

Flesh and Blood Yeshua (Jesus)

October 24th, 2013

“This is the bread that comes down from heaven, so that one may eat of it and not die. I am the living bread that came down from heaven. If anyone eats of this bread, he will live forever. And the bread that I will give for the life of the world is my flesh.” (John 6:50-51)

This is one of the verses that rabbis love to tout to demonstrate the terrible nature of Christian thought, as if Christianity were promoting cannibalism.  Indeed, Yeshua (Jesus) is responding here to the offense his Jewish listeners took when he spoke of this a few verses earlier (see John 6:.25-59 for the whole story).

But to take offense, is to lack understanding of the fact that Yeshua is speaking of spiritual things, not literal things.  The same confusion occurs in the 3rd chapter of John, when a Jewish priest by the name of Nicodemus is told that to see the kingdom of God he must be born again.  Nicodemus takes him literally, and asks how a man is to re-enter his mother’s womb to be reborn.  He doesn’t get that Yeshua is talking of a spiritual regeneration – reborn in his relationship with God (see John 3:1-21).

In chapter 4 we see the same thing, this time when Yeshua is speaking to a Samaritan woman.  He promises her living water that would permanently quench her thirst and she asks him for it assuming it was a physical thing – like Yeshua was some sort of snake-oil salesman.  But Yeshua was talking spiritually; that in having a right relationship with God through him, we can have eternal life.

And in our passage above, Yeshua is speaking spiritually once again.  It was, after all, his finger at Mount Sinai that put the law on the tablets of stone (Exodus 31:18); and it is by Yeshua’s finger again that, in the New Covenant promised by God through the prophet Jeremiah, the same law is written in our hearts (Jeremiah 31:31-34).  So when he speaks of partaking of his flesh and blood, he is talking about our partaking spiritually in his act of sacrifice on the cross that would bring atonement for our sins and enable us to enter into that New Covenant.

Many turned away because they misunderstood Yeshua.  Many turn away today for the same reason.  Don’t misunderstand the Word of God.  It is a spiritual book seeking to give you life eternal.

If you would like to know more about what Jesus truly taught, feel free to contact us.  We would be happy to send you a copy of the B’rit Hadashah (New Covenant or New Testament) to read, and we are always ready to help you to understand it.

Contributed by Daniel Muller, a Jewish believer and the General Director of New Covenant Forum.

Posted in Daniel Muller, Jesus and Israel, Jesus and Jews, Jewish Objections to Jesus, Jewish Tradition, Jews and Jesus, Messiah, New Covenant, Salvation, Some Words and Thoughts | No Comments »

A Tale of Two Messiahs

August 30th, 2013

IN THE DAYS OF YESHUA (JESUS), THE RABBIS RECOGNIZED TWO MESSIAHS

We know this from Talmud (traditions of the rabbis codified between the 2nd & 6th Centuries).

Victorious King Messiah – Moshiach ben Daveed ( Messiah son of David)

1.     Isaiah 27:13 –come at the blast of the shofar (the rams horn), when God promises that all of Israel will be redeemed and returned to the land.
2.     Psalm 2 – This is the conquering king Messiah
3.     Isaiah 9 – the one who would have the government upon his shoulders, and who would be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.

But the rabbis recognized another picture of messiah –

Suffering Servant Messiah – Moshiach ben Yosef (Messiah son of Joseph) – also called the Leprous Messiah (Sanhedrin 98b; quoting Isaiah 53:4)

1.     Isaiah 53 – This is the suffering servant passage: would suffer for our transgression (v. 5); upon whom our iniquities would be placed (vs. 5,6); would become an asham (guilt offering) for the atonement of the people’s sins (v. 10); he would be cut off from the land of the living (v.8), Isaiah tells us, but will then see the light of life (i.e. be resurrected; v. 10).
2.     Zechariah 9:9 – lowly and riding on a donkey.
3.     Psalm 22 – cry out, “My God, why have you forsaken me?” (v. 1), and suffer the anguish the psalmist writes of.

So if the rabbis had an understanding of these two pictures of Messiah:

  • Why were they unable to see Jesus for who he was?
  • Why did they miss him?
  • Why, in fact, did they do the very thing that God, through Isaiah, foretold in chapter 53 –despise him, reject him, and esteem him not?

You see the rabbis at that time reasoned in this way:

  • If Israel were righteous, then would come the Moshiach ben Daveed – the Conquering King Messiah – at the blast of the ram’s horn, on a white horse coming down from the clouds.  And he would bring Israel once again to prominence and bring peace to the whole world.
  • However, if Israel were unrighteous, then would come the Mochiach ben Yosef – the Suffering Servant Messiah – who would come humbly – lowly and riding on a donkey  A Messiah who would suffer for us and bear our sins. 

MISTAKEN IDENTITY: JESUS OUT OF CONTEXT

So if the Jewish scholars and sages knew both pictures of Messiah, why did they miss him?

Well, remember that since the return of the exiles, the religious Jew of his day considered himself doing all he could to be right with God.

  • He had all the Pharisaical traditions to follow.
  • He went to the temple regularly with his sacrifice.
  • He gave to the poor.
  • He fasted.
  • He did all the right things!

So did he think Israel was righteous, or unrighteous?  Righteous, of course.

So what Messiah was he expecting?  The Victorious King of course!

And that is the point!

  • For centuries, the people saw in their mind the Conquering King Messiah coming.
    • Another Judah Maccabee.
  • This was the expectation of the people because they believed themselves to be righteous.
  • So they refused to recognize the Suffering Servant Messiah when he came.

This is why Jesus says in John 5:45-47:

“Do not think that I will accuse you to the Father. There is one who accuses you: Moses, on whom you have set your hope.  For if you believed Moses, you would believe me; for he wrote of me.  But if you do not believe his writings, how will you believe my words?”

Jesus and the Jewish leaders were reading the same Scriptures!  But Yeshua could see what the leaders would not.  Many leaders did come to faith, like Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathea (see John 19:38-39).  Most did not.  Those that didn’t led the rest of Israel on the wrong path.

  • When the temple (the center of the sacrificial system by which Israel and Israelites could have atonement) is destroyed, then the question came:  how now can the Jewish people atone for their sins?
  • Then the Jewish leaders made new rules:
    • rules that took the temple out of the equation
    • rules that determined other means of atonement.

And so, by the 5th Century, when the Talmud was finally codified:

  • there was a whole system of law that included atonement for sin
  • but not by the standard of God (i.e. not through the sacrifice of the Suffering Servant Messiah, Yeshua)

My friend, Yeshua is not the Messiah of the Gentiles but the Messiah of Israel.  If you want to enter into the Olam Habah (to have eternal life with God our Father), you must believe in Him!

Contact us, and let us tell you how.  We would be happy to give you, free of charge, a book that tells you how twelve rabbis did just that.

Contributed by Daniel Muller, a Jewish believer and the General Director of New Covenant Forum.

Posted in Biblical Interpretation, Daniel Muller, Following God, Jesus and Israel, Jesus and Jews, Jewish Identity, Jewish Tradition, Jews and Jesus, Messiah in the Tanach, Redemption, Resurrection, Salvation, Talmud vs. Tanakh | No Comments »

PASSOVER: Clean Home and Clean Heart

March 27th, 2013

There’s something so attractive about ‘clean’!  It feels so good to be welcomed into a home that is warm, inviting and clean. It’s so invigorating to breathe clean air and drink clean water.

The town where I live has been known for its clean water, apparently among the best in Canada. Recently for the first time, we’ve had chlorine added – permanently. It’s been a disappointing change. Now pure, clean water has become a precious commodity. Of course, there are places in this world where people are sick and dying from lack of a clean water supply. So this morning I’ve been reflecting on how grateful I am for clean air, clean water, clean clothes, a clean home – and most of all a clean heart.

A clean heart?  What is that supposed to mean?

In Exodus, Moses passes on God’s instructions for the Passover:  “Unleavened bread shall be eaten for seven days; no leavened bread shall be seen with you, and no leaven shall be seen with you in all your territory” (Exodus 13:7). To this day Jewish homes are cleansed of all leavened products in preparation for the Passover and the Feast of Unleavened Bread.  Why? Leaven is a symbol of sin. (See article “Why Matzah?”)

As we begin to know the Lord by studying His Word, we see that He is always more concerned about the inside of a person’s life and heart than what is apparent on the outside. When God was about to choose a king for Israel, He said to the prophet Samuel, “…Do not look on his appearance or on the height of his stature … For the LORD sees not as man sees: man looks on the outward appearance, but the LORD looks on the heart” (1 Samuel 16:7). God was seeking a man after His own heart (1 Samuel 13:14). God chose David as King, and David reigned for a long time (2 Samuel 5:4-5).

Only God knows our hearts, and He wants to be with those whose hearts are clean (1 Chronicles 28:9; Jeremiah 17:10). King David wrote, “Who shall ascend the hill of the LORD? And who shall stand in his holy place? He who has clean hands and a pure heart, who does not lift up his soul to what is false and does not swear deceitfully”  (Psalm 24:3,4).

But who has never sinned against God?  Who has never chosen his own way over God’s way? Not a single person is righteous, for we have all turned to our own way (Ecclesiastes 7:20; Isaiah 53:6). Even what we consider to be righteous deeds are unclean to the Lord by His standards, unless our hearts are pure before Him (Isaiah 64:6).

So who then can stand before God?

That is the amazing beauty of the Passover!

God Himself made a way for us to be acceptable in His sight. In the Exodus from Egypt, the lamb was His Passover (Exodus 12:11). Only the lamb could appease God at that time. The blood of the lamb diverted God’s wrath away from those who applied the blood to the entrance of their homes and kept them sheltered by the blood until morning (Exodus 12:7,13,22,23). Those who didn’t, lost their firstborn on that terrible night.

And now we have the perspective of history unfolded. The Passover lamb was a picture foreshadowing the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world (John 1:29). Our prophet Isaiah described this Lamb of God, our Messiah, hundreds of years before Jesus came into this world (Isaiah 53:3-11). Now our Passover has been sacrificed for us, once forever, to cleanse us always from sin, guilt and shame to serve the living God (I Corinthians 5:7; Hebrews 9:14; 10:14)!

Our Lamb of God is also the Lion of the tribe of Judah,  the Root and Offspring of David, the Bright and Morning Star (Revelation 5:5; 22:16). He who loved us and washed us from our sins in His own blood is coming again. Then every eye shall see Him, every knee shall bow before Him, and every tongue shall confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father (Revelation 1:5-7; Philippians 2:9-11).

In the meantime, let’s give praise to God for our Passover Lamb slain from the foundation of the world, who alone can make our hearts clean (Revelation 13:8). Hallelujah, what a Saviour – what a Messiah!

Contributed by Cynthia Sugar, a Jewish believer in Jesus.

Posted in Cynthia Sugar, Following God, Jesus and Israel, Jesus and Jews, Jewish festivals, Jewish holidays, Jewish Tradition, Jews and Jesus, Messiah, Messiah in the Tanach, Redemption, Salvation, The Bible | No Comments »

Hag Sameach! Have a Joyful Pesach!

March 25th, 2013

The staff of New Covenant Forum send their warmest wishes for a blessed Pesach (Passover) celebration in this year 5773 (2013) to all our Jewish brethren around the world!

We pray that, in this season of God’s redemption, as you celebrate the redeeming life that was given through the Passover lamb, you will also celebrate the Lamb of God who gives eternal life to all who believe in Him: Yeshua HaMashiach (Jesus Christ).

Hag Sameach!  Have a joyful festival!

P.S.  A lesson I learned early in life: don’t hide the Afikomen too well – if no one finds it, the service can’t be concluded – makes for a very late night!

Posted in Jewish festivals, Jewish holidays, Jewish Tradition | No Comments »

The Wrong Jewish Experts

January 9th, 2013

The “Caspari Center for Biblical and Jewish Studies” sends a regular media report of Israeli articles dealing with Christian issues of relevance to believers in Yeshua (Jesus).  Recently it reported this:

HaMekomon Petah Tikva, December 26, 2012
In a short snippet addressed to children, Itzik the Clown explains what Christmas is: “During Christmas the Christian faith marks the birth of Jesus.” He adds that “today, Christmas is the most popular and most beloved holiday in the Western world. It is celebrated by religious and secular alike. Those who believe pray a special prayer in church, called Midnight Mass.” In his final message to the children, Itzik the Clown writes that “we [Israelis] who live in a land that is sacred to all religions must learn about those who live in our midst. This is how we will learn to respect one another and live peaceful and quiet lives. The religious wars caused lots of problems, and that’s why we need to respect one another.”

Itzik the Clown, a popular Israeli radio and TV celebrity, is genuinely trying to foster a spirit of peace, and for that he should be lauded.  Sadly, this article also highlights some of the ignorance of Christianity that the non-believing Jewish community often exhibits.

While Christmas is an important religious day for most Christians, it is not so for all.  This is especially true for many Jewish believers who do not observe the day (while many Jewish believers do).  It is also important to recognize that, while Christianity is the most popular holiday, especially to the secular world, from a religious perspective it is Easter that is of greatest importance.

The most egregious mistake in this article, to my mind, is when he says that, “those who believe pray a special prayer in church, called Midnight Mass.”

  1. Midnight Mass is a service, not a special prayer.
  2. Only Catholics celebrate Midnight Mass.   There are a great many believers outside the Catholic faith that celebrate in a variety of ways.
  3. Most believing Christians honour the Messiah’s birth throughout the day, and not just at church.

I suppose the error is trifling, but it highlights an important point.  Most of what Jewish people understand about Christianity comes from Jews who have no idea what Christianity is about, not just in Israel but everywhere.  And so Jews believe that:

  1. Christians worship three gods (which we don’t – there is only One – click here for more).
  2. The New Testament writers were anti-Semitic (which they weren’t – see this recent article).
  3. That baptism makes you a Christian (which it doesn’t – faith does).
  4. That the Pope speaks for all Christians (which he doesn’t – only for Roman Catholics)

These are just a few of the many misunderstandings of Christian belief that my Jewish people get hold of and believe, simply because Jewish “experts” who are not Christians say so.  It is amazing to me how man Jewish people go to such sources for their information, rather than to the people who do know: Christians.

If you are a Jewish person who doesn’t believe in Jesus and you are reading this, ask yourself this question:  am I rejecting Jesus because I know what faith in Jesus is really all about, or because people who don’t know Jesus are telling me not to?

Why don’t you speak to Jews who believe in Jesus and find out what we really believe and why we believe it?  Get the information to make your decision about Jesus from a knowledgeable source.  We are here to answer your questions about what faith in Yeshua is all about, honestly and without pressure, so that you can make an informed decision.  Contact us!

Contributed by Daniel Muller, a Jewish believer and the General Director of New Covenant Forum.

Posted in Daniel Muller, Evangelism, Jesus and Jews, Jewish Tradition, Jews and Christianity, Jews and Jesus, Knowing God, This, That, The Other Thing | No Comments »

Is the New Testament Anti-Semitic?

January 7th, 2013

For centuries, Jewish scholars and leaders have touted the B’rit Hadashah (the New Testament) as anti-Semitic.  Recently I came across an internet article (link here) attributed to Shmuel Golding, which states:

Bible-intoxicated Christians through the ages have thrown in the teeth of the Jews the demonic charges of “Christ-killers” and have fanned the flames of Jew-hatred using the New Testament for their justification.

While it is clear that historically there have been members of the Church who have done this, it would be extremely erroneous to say that they were “bible-intoxicated.”  The vast majority of these persecutors of Jewish people, far from being intoxicated with the Bible, had hardly imbibed the Bible at all.  That is not to say that there were not some Christians who knew the B’rit Hadashah (New Testament) and yet were foolishly anti-Semitic, but for the most part, the principle sources of anti-Semitism throughout the ages were an  ignorance of Scriptures and the agendas of wrong-thinking religious and political leaders.

Historically, much of this anti-Semitism came about after Christianity became the state religion of the Roman Empire.  Often Jewish critics conveniently forget the anti-Christianity of Judaism that went on before that time.  I, myself, have been on the receiving side of such hatred, and primarily because I’m a Jew (a new form of anti-Semitism).  In the end, these hatreds have everything to do with the weaknesses of humankind and its rebelliousness against God (i.e. sin) and nothing to do with Scriptures.

While modern Jewish rhetoric is quick to point out the perpetrators of anti-Semitism throughout the ages, they do not speak to the many Christians throughout history who have stood up for the Jewish people, and spoken out against hatred of them, including many church leaders in the Middle Ages.  It is interesting to me that the tendency in the Evangelical Church since the 19th Century to care about the Jewish people and, more recently, about the State of Israel, has come at a time when Scriptural literacy in the church is on the increase.

A fair reading of the B’rit Hadashah would show that Yeshua (Jesus) and the writers of the B’rit Hadashah (all of whom were Jewish) cared about their Jewish people, just as the prophets in the Tanakh (Hebrew Scriptures or Old Testament) did.  

  • Like those prophets, the writers of the B’rit Hadashah condemned those who were not obedient to God. 
  • Like the prophets of old, they warned their Israelite brothers of the consequences of their disobedience. 
  • Like the prophets of old, they urged their Jewish people to believe in the Messiah God promised in the Tanakh and fulfilled in the coming of Yeshua HaMashiach (Jesus Christ).

The dispute Yeshua and his disciples had with the Jewish leaders of the day was an internally Jewish one.  While a remnant of the Jewish people believed in Messiah Yeshua (including many leaders – see Acts 6:7) and entered into the New Covenant promised by God (see Jeremiah 31:31-34), most did not.  The same can be said of the Gentile world.  In the end the B’rit Hadashah points out that all can be saved to eternal life, through Messiah’s sacrifice on the cross, and all are condemned if they do not, regardless of whether they are Jewish or Gentile.

The B’rit Hadashah is not anti-Semitic.  It speaks of the fulfillment of God’s promises in the Tanakh by the one whom God promised, who himself was God as promised in the Tanakh (Isaiah 9:6; Isaiah 52:10-53:12).  Won’t you come to him and have eternal life?  If you would like to know how or want to know more, please contact us.

Contributed by Daniel Muller, a Jewish believer and the General Director of New Covenant Forum.

Posted in Daniel Muller, Jesus and Israel, Jewish Identity, Jewish Objections to Jesus, Jewish Tradition, Jews and Christianity, Messiah, Messiah in the Tanach, Salvation, The Bible | No Comments »

Some Words and Thoughts

January 4th, 2013

Then the LORD caused to rain upon Sodom and upon Gomorrah brimstone and fire from the LORD out of heaven;
(Genesis 19:24, Jewish Publication Society)

In Genesis 18, God appears to Abraham in physical form along with two other individuals.  Although the rabbis try to explain this away, the plain meaning of the text is clear – God took on physical form, ate with Abraham (even ate dairy and meat together – imagine that!) and walked around with him – read it for yourself.

In Genesis 19, the two individual with God turn out to be angels who go down to Sodom, speak with Abraham’s nephew Lot and then take him away from Sodom before God destroys Sodom and Gomorrah and the other sinful towns in the area.

The destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah begins with the verse quoted above.  God on earth reigns down fire and brimstone from God in Heaven.  Could it be that the biblical understanding of the nature of God is at odds with rabbinic understanding?  Could it be that the homogeneous oneness of God that traditional Judaism proclaims is merely the result of a polemic against a pluralistic view of God’s unity as understood by both Jewish and Gentile Christians.  Could it me that the idea of the tri-une nature of God is actually the biblical one and true?

John Wesley, an 18th Century commentator, reflects upon Genesis 19:24 in this way:

Then the Lord rained – from the Lord – God the Son, from God the Father, for the Father has committed all judgment to the Son. He that is the Saviour will be the destroyer of those that reject the salvation.

Let’s get scriptural shall we?!  Food for thought.  Contact us if you wish to know more or if you need a bible.

 

Posted in Anonymous, Biblical Interpretation, Jewish Tradition, Knowing God, Some Words and Thoughts, Talmud vs. Tanakh, Things Doctrinal and Theological | No Comments »

The Real Shammas of Hanukkah

December 14th, 2012

At Hanukkah, we light the nine-armed menorah called a Hanukkiah.  The middle candle, the one that lights all the others, is called the shammas – the leader.

We light the Hanukkiah because our sages tell us that when the Maccabees conquered the Syrian Greeks and wanted to reconsecrate the Temple, they could only find one vial of oil, enough to light the menorah for one day.  But when they used that vial, the light lasted eight days, just enough time to make more vials for use.

This great miracle of God is remembered as we light the Hanukkiah. It’s a wonderful, if not biblical story – and, who knows, it may very well have happened.  After all, though the book of the Tanakh (Hebrew Scriptures) was closed at the time and the Book of the B’rit Hadashah (New Testament) was not yet begun, still God was then, as he still is, “in the miracle business.”

It is amazing to me, however, that the vast majority of the Jewish people will celebrate this apocryphal story, but cannot seem to recognize the even greater miracle of their Messiah Yeshua (Jesus) – the greatest light that ever shone.

After all, Isaiah wrote of him:

The people who walked in darkness have seen a great light; those who dwelt in a land of deep darkness, on them has light shined.
Isaiah 9:2 (see the whole of Isaiah 9:1-7)

Isaiah goes on to describe the coming of this light:

For to us a child is born, to us a son is given; and the government shall be upon his shoulder, and his name shall be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.
Isaiah 9:6

Isaiah continued to talk about his ministry, death and resurrection in Isaiah 53.  Jeremiah spoke of the New Covenant that he would inaugurate in Jeremiah 31:31-34.  Zechariah also talked of him, and promised a time when all Israel would one day recognize him before he comes again (Zechariah 12:10-13:1).

Such a miracle of light was promised, and God kept His promised and made His Messiah known and knowable through His Word.  Yet, tragically, the vast majority of the Jewish people do not recognize this most palpable of miracles.

Yet this miracle is knowable.  Let us send you the evidence of the Messiah’s coming.  Contact us, and let us help you to recognize him for who he really is: the real Shammas of Hanukkah and all other times; the true light of the world!

Posted in Anonymous, Jesus and Jews, Jewish festivals, Jewish holidays, Jewish Tradition, Jews and Jesus, Messiah, Messiah in the Tanach, New Covenant, Resurrection | No Comments »

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