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Are you good enough for God?

January 22nd, 2014

Behold, the LORD’s hand is not shortened, that it cannot save, or his ear dull, that it cannot hear; but your iniquities have made a separation between you and your God, and your sins have hidden his face from you so that he does not hear.
(Isaiah 59:1-2)

Surely there is not a righteous man on earth who does good and never sins.
(Ecclesiastes 7:20) 

But we are all as an unclean thing, and all our righteousnesses are as filthy rags; and we all do fade as a leaf; and our iniquities, like the wind, have taken us away.
(Isaiah 64:6)

Are you sure you are going to have eternal life with God?  If so, and if the Words of God quoted above is true, then on what basis to you believe this?  There is a way to be sure!  Contact us and find out.

Posted in Anonymous, Following God, Salvation, Some Words and Thoughts | No Comments »

Hanukkah with Thanksgiving

November 28th, 2013

My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and they follow me. I give them eternal life, and they will never perish, and no one will snatch them out of my hand. My Father, who has given them to me, is greater than all, and no one is able to snatch them out of the Father’s hand. I and the Father are one.” (John 10:27-30)

These words were spoken by Yeshua (Jesus) in the Temple in Jerusalem during the Feast of Dedication – what we call Hanukkah.  Today is the first day of Hanukkah.  It is also the day when our American friends will be celebrating Thanksgiving.

Both of these holidays are intended to be centered around family festivities – the family coming together to celebrate God’s provision.  At Thanksgiving we celebrate God’s providing us not only with food and shelter as he did our early forebears who came to dwell here, but also to celebrate the land of freedom for which both the U.S. and Canada are renowned; freedom of conscience, of religion, of expression and many other freedoms.  At Hanukkah, we celebrate God’s victory for his people Israel over the Syrian Greeks, and his provision in enabling the people to rededicate themselves to Him.

Yeshua, in the passage above, reminds us of God’s dedication to us, especially as we dedicate ourselves to Him.  We are his sheep, and we are called on to listen to Him.  Yeshua was our Messiah, God come in human form to provide the means for eternal life He promised us through the prophet Jeremiah (Jeremiah 31:31-34), and so we are called on to follow Him.

To not believe in God, is to celebrate Thanksgiving meaninglessly.  It is as foolish as talking on the phone when no one is on the other end.  We may celebrate all the trappings, but the reason for our joy is gone and the holiday serves no true purpose.

To not believe in Yeshua, is to celebrate Hanukkah meaninglessly.  Because, though God is dedicated to us, he only provides the reason for our joy through our dedication to Him – and that is by faith in the Messiah of Israel, Yeshua.  We may celebrate with all the trappings, but the holiday serves no true purpose.

This year, let us all celebrate Hanukkah with thanksgiving for the joy of eternal life vouchsafed by God through our faith in Messiah Yeshua.

Posted in Anonymous, Following God, Jesus and Israel, Jesus and Jews, Jewish festivals, Jewish holidays, Jews and Jesus, Messiah, New Covenant, Salvation, The Bible | No Comments »

Flesh and Blood Yeshua (Jesus)

October 24th, 2013

“This is the bread that comes down from heaven, so that one may eat of it and not die. I am the living bread that came down from heaven. If anyone eats of this bread, he will live forever. And the bread that I will give for the life of the world is my flesh.” (John 6:50-51)

This is one of the verses that rabbis love to tout to demonstrate the terrible nature of Christian thought, as if Christianity were promoting cannibalism.  Indeed, Yeshua (Jesus) is responding here to the offense his Jewish listeners took when he spoke of this a few verses earlier (see John 6:.25-59 for the whole story).

But to take offense, is to lack understanding of the fact that Yeshua is speaking of spiritual things, not literal things.  The same confusion occurs in the 3rd chapter of John, when a Jewish priest by the name of Nicodemus is told that to see the kingdom of God he must be born again.  Nicodemus takes him literally, and asks how a man is to re-enter his mother’s womb to be reborn.  He doesn’t get that Yeshua is talking of a spiritual regeneration – reborn in his relationship with God (see John 3:1-21).

In chapter 4 we see the same thing, this time when Yeshua is speaking to a Samaritan woman.  He promises her living water that would permanently quench her thirst and she asks him for it assuming it was a physical thing – like Yeshua was some sort of snake-oil salesman.  But Yeshua was talking spiritually; that in having a right relationship with God through him, we can have eternal life.

And in our passage above, Yeshua is speaking spiritually once again.  It was, after all, his finger at Mount Sinai that put the law on the tablets of stone (Exodus 31:18); and it is by Yeshua’s finger again that, in the New Covenant promised by God through the prophet Jeremiah, the same law is written in our hearts (Jeremiah 31:31-34).  So when he speaks of partaking of his flesh and blood, he is talking about our partaking spiritually in his act of sacrifice on the cross that would bring atonement for our sins and enable us to enter into that New Covenant.

Many turned away because they misunderstood Yeshua.  Many turn away today for the same reason.  Don’t misunderstand the Word of God.  It is a spiritual book seeking to give you life eternal.

If you would like to know more about what Jesus truly taught, feel free to contact us.  We would be happy to send you a copy of the B’rit Hadashah (New Covenant or New Testament) to read, and we are always ready to help you to understand it.

Contributed by Daniel Muller, a Jewish believer and the General Director of New Covenant Forum.

Posted in Daniel Muller, Jesus and Israel, Jesus and Jews, Jewish Objections to Jesus, Jewish Tradition, Jews and Jesus, Messiah, New Covenant, Salvation, Some Words and Thoughts | No Comments »

Yom Kippur Opportunity

September 13th, 2013

This evening is Yom Kippur.  What an opportune time for us to draw near to God and let His Spirit move in our hearts!

We tend to be so slow in recognizing our indebtedness to our Heavenly Father, Creator of the universe (melech ha-olam – king of the universe); slow in humbling ourselves before Him and confessing our sins and seeking forgiveness.  This is the one time of year in the Jewish calendar when we are more aware of this need in our lives.

In fact, this self-examination is prescribed for us both biblically and traditionally.  Moses described the Day of Atonement in Leviticus chapters 16 and 23. The high priest represented the people to God.  He alone could enter the holiest place in the tabernacle, and only once a year.  Even then he had to first offer a perfect animal sacrifice for his own sin, and then he and his priests offered sacrifices for the people, so their sins would be ‘covered’.  Since the Temple in Jerusalem was destroyed in the first century, we have replaced these animal sacrifices with our mitzvot, our good deeds.

In contrast, when our Messiah Yeshua (Jesus) came, He replaced these repetitive animal sacrifices by the costly sacrifice of Himself.  He knew that when the Temple was destroyed we would have no need to re-institute the animal sacrifices. The new covenant that God promised for us so long ago through His prophet Jeremiah came into effect (Jeremiah 31:31-34).  He set aside the first covenant so He could establish the second (Hebrews 10:9)

Yeshua, the Messiah of Israel and the Saviour of the world, is the only One who could take our place and be sacrificed for us, since He alone was without sin.  Now His is the only acceptable sacrifice to God which allows us to enter His holy Presence.

The Bible is an accurate record of the history of our people and of God’s intervention in our lives.  He loves us so much that He gave His only Son so that we can come to Him and find joy in His Presence now and forever.

If you find this teaching questionable, or confusing, or interesting enough to pursue, why not contact Daniel or Alan at newcovenantforum.org?  They’d be happy to discuss it with you and answer your questions.

Contributed by Cynthia Sugar, a Jewish believer in Jesus.

Posted in Atonement, Cynthia Sugar, Jesus and Jews, Jewish festivals, Messiah, New Covenant, Salvation | No Comments »

It’s the High Holidays!

September 11th, 2013

It’s the High Holidays!  It’s a time for spiritual awakening; a call to repentance as we prepare for Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement.  We are to recognize our transgressions against God; we are to turn away from doing them and turn towards God.

So before Yom Kippur we ramp up our good activities and try to reduce our bad ones.  On Yom Kippur we fast and pray.  In the end, we hope that our good deeds outweigh our bad deeds sufficiently to have our names written in the Book of Life, as if our actions could ever meet the standards of our holy, perfect God.  In the end, we have no assurance – we just hope and pray that our sacrifice is acceptable to God, all the time knowing deep inside that it can never be sufficient.

What if, however, our eternal life had nothing to do with our merit and everything to do with the Lord’s?  What if our relationship with God was based on just that – our relationship and not our deeds or lack of them?  What if it were our faith that determined our eternal destiny?

In the Tanakh (Old Testament) it is written, “the righteous shall live by faith” (Habakkuk 2:4).

Surely we already have the love of God, but we only inherit his kingdom if we are in right relationship with him by faith.  After all, we who are in God’s image love our children, even though they do wrong, but we long for them to be in right relationship with us.

For this reason, God came to be amongst us in human form (much like he did with Abraham in Genesis 18), and became a guilt offering for us (Isaiah 53:10).  This was Yeshua (Jesus) who died on the cross for our sins and who said,

“For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him.”
(John 3:16-17)

Yeshua has paid the price of sin eternally for us. We do not need to wonder, for we know that the sacrifice for our sin is complete. God has provided the way for you and me.

This Yom Kippur, as you contemplate your sinfulness before God, why not receive forgiveness the way God intended: through our Messiah Yeshua.  If you want to know more, please contact us.

HAG SAMEACH!

Posted in Anonymous, Atonement, Following God, Jewish festivals, Messiah, New Covenant, Redemption, Salvation | No Comments »

A Tale of Two Messiahs

August 30th, 2013

IN THE DAYS OF YESHUA (JESUS), THE RABBIS RECOGNIZED TWO MESSIAHS

We know this from Talmud (traditions of the rabbis codified between the 2nd & 6th Centuries).

Victorious King Messiah – Moshiach ben Daveed ( Messiah son of David)

1.     Isaiah 27:13 –come at the blast of the shofar (the rams horn), when God promises that all of Israel will be redeemed and returned to the land.
2.     Psalm 2 – This is the conquering king Messiah
3.     Isaiah 9 – the one who would have the government upon his shoulders, and who would be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.

But the rabbis recognized another picture of messiah –

Suffering Servant Messiah – Moshiach ben Yosef (Messiah son of Joseph) – also called the Leprous Messiah (Sanhedrin 98b; quoting Isaiah 53:4)

1.     Isaiah 53 – This is the suffering servant passage: would suffer for our transgression (v. 5); upon whom our iniquities would be placed (vs. 5,6); would become an asham (guilt offering) for the atonement of the people’s sins (v. 10); he would be cut off from the land of the living (v.8), Isaiah tells us, but will then see the light of life (i.e. be resurrected; v. 10).
2.     Zechariah 9:9 – lowly and riding on a donkey.
3.     Psalm 22 – cry out, “My God, why have you forsaken me?” (v. 1), and suffer the anguish the psalmist writes of.

So if the rabbis had an understanding of these two pictures of Messiah:

  • Why were they unable to see Jesus for who he was?
  • Why did they miss him?
  • Why, in fact, did they do the very thing that God, through Isaiah, foretold in chapter 53 –despise him, reject him, and esteem him not?

You see the rabbis at that time reasoned in this way:

  • If Israel were righteous, then would come the Moshiach ben Daveed – the Conquering King Messiah – at the blast of the ram’s horn, on a white horse coming down from the clouds.  And he would bring Israel once again to prominence and bring peace to the whole world.
  • However, if Israel were unrighteous, then would come the Mochiach ben Yosef – the Suffering Servant Messiah – who would come humbly – lowly and riding on a donkey  A Messiah who would suffer for us and bear our sins. 

MISTAKEN IDENTITY: JESUS OUT OF CONTEXT

So if the Jewish scholars and sages knew both pictures of Messiah, why did they miss him?

Well, remember that since the return of the exiles, the religious Jew of his day considered himself doing all he could to be right with God.

  • He had all the Pharisaical traditions to follow.
  • He went to the temple regularly with his sacrifice.
  • He gave to the poor.
  • He fasted.
  • He did all the right things!

So did he think Israel was righteous, or unrighteous?  Righteous, of course.

So what Messiah was he expecting?  The Victorious King of course!

And that is the point!

  • For centuries, the people saw in their mind the Conquering King Messiah coming.
    • Another Judah Maccabee.
  • This was the expectation of the people because they believed themselves to be righteous.
  • So they refused to recognize the Suffering Servant Messiah when he came.

This is why Jesus says in John 5:45-47:

“Do not think that I will accuse you to the Father. There is one who accuses you: Moses, on whom you have set your hope.  For if you believed Moses, you would believe me; for he wrote of me.  But if you do not believe his writings, how will you believe my words?”

Jesus and the Jewish leaders were reading the same Scriptures!  But Yeshua could see what the leaders would not.  Many leaders did come to faith, like Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathea (see John 19:38-39).  Most did not.  Those that didn’t led the rest of Israel on the wrong path.

  • When the temple (the center of the sacrificial system by which Israel and Israelites could have atonement) is destroyed, then the question came:  how now can the Jewish people atone for their sins?
  • Then the Jewish leaders made new rules:
    • rules that took the temple out of the equation
    • rules that determined other means of atonement.

And so, by the 5th Century, when the Talmud was finally codified:

  • there was a whole system of law that included atonement for sin
  • but not by the standard of God (i.e. not through the sacrifice of the Suffering Servant Messiah, Yeshua)

My friend, Yeshua is not the Messiah of the Gentiles but the Messiah of Israel.  If you want to enter into the Olam Habah (to have eternal life with God our Father), you must believe in Him!

Contact us, and let us tell you how.  We would be happy to give you, free of charge, a book that tells you how twelve rabbis did just that.

Contributed by Daniel Muller, a Jewish believer and the General Director of New Covenant Forum.

Posted in Biblical Interpretation, Daniel Muller, Following God, Jesus and Israel, Jesus and Jews, Jewish Identity, Jewish Tradition, Jews and Jesus, Messiah in the Tanach, Redemption, Resurrection, Salvation, Talmud vs. Tanakh | No Comments »

PASSOVER: Clean Home and Clean Heart

March 27th, 2013

There’s something so attractive about ‘clean’!  It feels so good to be welcomed into a home that is warm, inviting and clean. It’s so invigorating to breathe clean air and drink clean water.

The town where I live has been known for its clean water, apparently among the best in Canada. Recently for the first time, we’ve had chlorine added – permanently. It’s been a disappointing change. Now pure, clean water has become a precious commodity. Of course, there are places in this world where people are sick and dying from lack of a clean water supply. So this morning I’ve been reflecting on how grateful I am for clean air, clean water, clean clothes, a clean home – and most of all a clean heart.

A clean heart?  What is that supposed to mean?

In Exodus, Moses passes on God’s instructions for the Passover:  “Unleavened bread shall be eaten for seven days; no leavened bread shall be seen with you, and no leaven shall be seen with you in all your territory” (Exodus 13:7). To this day Jewish homes are cleansed of all leavened products in preparation for the Passover and the Feast of Unleavened Bread.  Why? Leaven is a symbol of sin. (See article “Why Matzah?”)

As we begin to know the Lord by studying His Word, we see that He is always more concerned about the inside of a person’s life and heart than what is apparent on the outside. When God was about to choose a king for Israel, He said to the prophet Samuel, “…Do not look on his appearance or on the height of his stature … For the LORD sees not as man sees: man looks on the outward appearance, but the LORD looks on the heart” (1 Samuel 16:7). God was seeking a man after His own heart (1 Samuel 13:14). God chose David as King, and David reigned for a long time (2 Samuel 5:4-5).

Only God knows our hearts, and He wants to be with those whose hearts are clean (1 Chronicles 28:9; Jeremiah 17:10). King David wrote, “Who shall ascend the hill of the LORD? And who shall stand in his holy place? He who has clean hands and a pure heart, who does not lift up his soul to what is false and does not swear deceitfully”  (Psalm 24:3,4).

But who has never sinned against God?  Who has never chosen his own way over God’s way? Not a single person is righteous, for we have all turned to our own way (Ecclesiastes 7:20; Isaiah 53:6). Even what we consider to be righteous deeds are unclean to the Lord by His standards, unless our hearts are pure before Him (Isaiah 64:6).

So who then can stand before God?

That is the amazing beauty of the Passover!

God Himself made a way for us to be acceptable in His sight. In the Exodus from Egypt, the lamb was His Passover (Exodus 12:11). Only the lamb could appease God at that time. The blood of the lamb diverted God’s wrath away from those who applied the blood to the entrance of their homes and kept them sheltered by the blood until morning (Exodus 12:7,13,22,23). Those who didn’t, lost their firstborn on that terrible night.

And now we have the perspective of history unfolded. The Passover lamb was a picture foreshadowing the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world (John 1:29). Our prophet Isaiah described this Lamb of God, our Messiah, hundreds of years before Jesus came into this world (Isaiah 53:3-11). Now our Passover has been sacrificed for us, once forever, to cleanse us always from sin, guilt and shame to serve the living God (I Corinthians 5:7; Hebrews 9:14; 10:14)!

Our Lamb of God is also the Lion of the tribe of Judah,  the Root and Offspring of David, the Bright and Morning Star (Revelation 5:5; 22:16). He who loved us and washed us from our sins in His own blood is coming again. Then every eye shall see Him, every knee shall bow before Him, and every tongue shall confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father (Revelation 1:5-7; Philippians 2:9-11).

In the meantime, let’s give praise to God for our Passover Lamb slain from the foundation of the world, who alone can make our hearts clean (Revelation 13:8). Hallelujah, what a Saviour – what a Messiah!

Contributed by Cynthia Sugar, a Jewish believer in Jesus.

Posted in Cynthia Sugar, Following God, Jesus and Israel, Jesus and Jews, Jewish festivals, Jewish holidays, Jewish Tradition, Jews and Jesus, Messiah, Messiah in the Tanach, Redemption, Salvation, The Bible | No Comments »

PASSOVER: Exemplifying God’s love and mercy.

March 25th, 2013

In designing and instituting the Passover, God displayed His passion to save us, His power to overcome evil and His provision of a way of escape from judgment (Exodus 12).

Why did He do it? Because He loves us passionately to the point of sacrificial love, and because He wants our lives to reflect who He is (Isaiah 43:21; Hosea 14:4; Ephesians 1:6).

The Passover is a picture of a greater salvation, not only for Israel, but for everyone. God knew from the beginning of time that we would separate ourselves from Him (Isaiah 59:2) and that we would need a Saviour from spiritual darkness, from evil, and from our own wayward bent. So He created a plan to rescue us. Yeshua’s (Jesus’) sacrifice for us on the cross is so significant that it marks the division of all time:  the Tanakh (Hebrew Scriptures or Old Testament) looks forward to it and the B’rit Hadashah (New Testament) looks back at it. Our Messiah-Redeemer has come and one day He’s returning in power and glory.

Today we need God’s intervention again: on a personal level from our own sin and self-centeredness and on a national level for the protection and deliverance of Israel from those bent on her destruction.

As you celebrate Passover this year, worship the living God, the God of Israel, the Creator and Saviour of the world.  After all, the God of the Passover is the God of the Cross (Exodus 12:7,13; 1 Corinthians 5:7,8).  He is the same yesterday, today and forever (John 8:58; Hebrews 13:8). He is the mighty God, merciful and awesome in judgment.

May we humble ourselves before Him and be ready to meet Him face to face.

Contributed by Cynthia Sugar, a Jewish believer in Jesus.

Posted in Cynthia Sugar, Jewish festivals, Jewish holidays, Knowing God, Messiah, Messiah in the Tanach, Redemption, Salvation | No Comments »

Coming Out!

January 22nd, 2013

But the LORD God called to the man and said to him, “Where are you?” And [Adam] said, “I heard the sound of you in the garden, and I was afraid, because I was naked, and I hid myself.”
(Genesis 3:9-10)

The story of the Fall of Man is a familiar one to those who have any familiarity with the Scriptures.  Adam and Eve were dwelling in the garden made for them, Eden, when the chief of the fallen angels, Satan, tempted our first parents to disobey God and eat the fruit of the knowledge of good and evil – in defiance of the one commandment God had given them.  As a result their eyes were opened to sin and, as we are told, “the eyes of both were opened, and they knew that they were naked” (Genesis 3:7). 

In other words, sin had brought a separation between them – they found the need to cover up.  Even more tragically, their sin also brought about a separation from God so that they, “hid themselves from the presence of the Lord God” (Genesis 3:8; see also Isaiah 59:2).  God, of course, knew where they were, but he nevertheless calls out, “Where are you?”

Adam had two choices: continue to hide, or come out and confess.  It is clear from our passage that he decided on the latter.  Although much of the rest of the chapter deals with the consequences of this first of mankind’s rebellion against God’s rule, it also points out the importance of response. 

We cannot know what God would have done if Adam and Eve had continued their defiance in hiding.  As creator God had every right to destroy them and wipe them off the face of the earth, but he did not.  Adam and Eve were tempted to act rebelliously, but they were not rebellious in their hearts and so they answered God when he called.

God is calling out to you: “Where are you?”  We have all gone astray and turned away from Him (Isaiah 53:6), but he is ready to restore us if we answer his call.  In fact, he came to earth in the form of Messiah Yeshua (Jesus) to once again walk with us, and to call out to us to come to Him.  And upon dying on the cross, he gave us the means to be reconciled with God, if we would but come to Him in faith through Messiah’s (Christ’s) sacrifice.

Will you come out from hiding and answer God’s call as our first parents did?  Will you confess your sins, and be restored to him through faith in Yeshua HaMashiach (Jesus Christ)?  If you do then you can recite the prayer on this link.  Or you can contact us to learn more.

May the Lord shine His face upon you and be gracious unto you. (Numbers 6:25)

 

Posted in Daniel Muller, Following God, Messiah, Salvation, The Bible, This, That, The Other Thing | No Comments »

Is the New Testament Anti-Semitic?

January 7th, 2013

For centuries, Jewish scholars and leaders have touted the B’rit Hadashah (the New Testament) as anti-Semitic.  Recently I came across an internet article (link here) attributed to Shmuel Golding, which states:

Bible-intoxicated Christians through the ages have thrown in the teeth of the Jews the demonic charges of “Christ-killers” and have fanned the flames of Jew-hatred using the New Testament for their justification.

While it is clear that historically there have been members of the Church who have done this, it would be extremely erroneous to say that they were “bible-intoxicated.”  The vast majority of these persecutors of Jewish people, far from being intoxicated with the Bible, had hardly imbibed the Bible at all.  That is not to say that there were not some Christians who knew the B’rit Hadashah (New Testament) and yet were foolishly anti-Semitic, but for the most part, the principle sources of anti-Semitism throughout the ages were an  ignorance of Scriptures and the agendas of wrong-thinking religious and political leaders.

Historically, much of this anti-Semitism came about after Christianity became the state religion of the Roman Empire.  Often Jewish critics conveniently forget the anti-Christianity of Judaism that went on before that time.  I, myself, have been on the receiving side of such hatred, and primarily because I’m a Jew (a new form of anti-Semitism).  In the end, these hatreds have everything to do with the weaknesses of humankind and its rebelliousness against God (i.e. sin) and nothing to do with Scriptures.

While modern Jewish rhetoric is quick to point out the perpetrators of anti-Semitism throughout the ages, they do not speak to the many Christians throughout history who have stood up for the Jewish people, and spoken out against hatred of them, including many church leaders in the Middle Ages.  It is interesting to me that the tendency in the Evangelical Church since the 19th Century to care about the Jewish people and, more recently, about the State of Israel, has come at a time when Scriptural literacy in the church is on the increase.

A fair reading of the B’rit Hadashah would show that Yeshua (Jesus) and the writers of the B’rit Hadashah (all of whom were Jewish) cared about their Jewish people, just as the prophets in the Tanakh (Hebrew Scriptures or Old Testament) did.  

  • Like those prophets, the writers of the B’rit Hadashah condemned those who were not obedient to God. 
  • Like the prophets of old, they warned their Israelite brothers of the consequences of their disobedience. 
  • Like the prophets of old, they urged their Jewish people to believe in the Messiah God promised in the Tanakh and fulfilled in the coming of Yeshua HaMashiach (Jesus Christ).

The dispute Yeshua and his disciples had with the Jewish leaders of the day was an internally Jewish one.  While a remnant of the Jewish people believed in Messiah Yeshua (including many leaders – see Acts 6:7) and entered into the New Covenant promised by God (see Jeremiah 31:31-34), most did not.  The same can be said of the Gentile world.  In the end the B’rit Hadashah points out that all can be saved to eternal life, through Messiah’s sacrifice on the cross, and all are condemned if they do not, regardless of whether they are Jewish or Gentile.

The B’rit Hadashah is not anti-Semitic.  It speaks of the fulfillment of God’s promises in the Tanakh by the one whom God promised, who himself was God as promised in the Tanakh (Isaiah 9:6; Isaiah 52:10-53:12).  Won’t you come to him and have eternal life?  If you would like to know how or want to know more, please contact us.

Contributed by Daniel Muller, a Jewish believer and the General Director of New Covenant Forum.

Posted in Daniel Muller, Jesus and Israel, Jewish Identity, Jewish Objections to Jesus, Jewish Tradition, Jews and Christianity, Messiah, Messiah in the Tanach, Salvation, The Bible | No Comments »

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